Invited talks

Confirmed invited speakers at ISPDC 2008:

Plenary technical talks and tutorials on high performance computing at Sun, IBM, Intel are also confirmed.



Abstracts and speakers


Finding speedup in parallel processors


Michael J. Flynn
Maxeler Technologies and Stanford University

Abstract: The emphasis on multi core architectures and multi node parallel processors comes about, in part, from the failure of frequency scaling not because of breakthroughs in parallel programming or architecture.

Progress in automatic compilation of serial programs into multi tasked ones has been slow. The standard approach to programming HPC is to implement an application on as many multi core processors as possible, up to a point of memory saturation; after which partitioning continues over multiple such nodes. Now the inter node communications reduces the computational efficiency and scales up cost, power, cooling requirements and reliability concerns.

We’ll consider an alternative model which stresses maximizing the node speedup as far as possible before considering multi node partitioning. Node speedup starts with the use of an accelerator (FPGA based, so far) adjunct to the computational node and then uses a cylindrical rather than layered programming model to insure application speedup.

About speaker...
Michael J. Flynn

Michael J. Flynn received his PhD from Purdue University and began his engineering career at IBM as a designer of mainframe computers. He became Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford in 1975 where he set up the Stanford Architecture and Arithmetic group. He retired from Stanford in 1999. Some of his best-known work includes the development of the now familiar stream outline of computer organization (SIMD, etc.). For more than 30 years this has served as the fundamental formal taxonomy of parallel computers.

In 1970 he co-authored the first detailed discussion of techniques for the simultaneous execution of multiple instructions, now called super scalar design.

In the early 1970s Prof. Flynn founded both of the specialist organizations on Computer Architecture: the IEEE Computer Society's Technical Committee on Computer Architecture and the ACM's SIGARCH.

Prof. Flynn was the 1992 recipient of the ACM/IEEE Eckert-Mauchley Award for his technical contributions to computer and digital systems architecture. He was the 1995 recipient of the IEEE-CS Harry Goode Memorial Award in recognition of his outstanding contribution to the design and classification of computer architecture. In 1998 he received the Tesla Medal from the International Tesla Society (Belgrade), and an honorary Doctor of Science from Trinity College (University of Dublin), Ireland. He is the author of five books and over 300 technical papers. He is a fellow of both the IEEE and ACM.


Holistic Design of Multicore Architectures


Dean Tullsen
University of California, San Diego, USA

Dean Tullsen

Abstract: In recent years, the processor industry has moved from a uniprocessor focus to increasing numbers of cores on chip. But we cannot view those cores in the same way we did when we lived in a uniprocessor world. Previously, we expected each core to provide good performance on virtually any application, with energy efficiency, and without error. But now the level of interface with the user and the system is the entire multicore chip, and those requirements need only be met at the chip level — no single core need meet them. This provides the opportunity to think about processor architecture in whole new ways.

About speaker...

Dean Tullsen is a professor in the computer science and engineering department at UCSD. He received his PhD from the University of Washington in 1996, where he introduced the concept of simultaneous multithreading (hyper-threading). He has continued to work in the area of computer architecture and back-end compilation, where with various co-authors he has introduced many new ideas to the research community, including threaded multipath execution, symbiotic job scheduling for multithreaded processors, dynamic critical path prediction, speculative precomputation, heterogeneous multi-core architectures, conjoined core architectures, and event-driven simultaneous code optimization. He is editor-in-chief of the ACM Transactions on Architecture and Code Optimization.


Novel distributed processing paradigms: computing with condensed graphs


John Morrison
University College Cork, Ireland

John Morrison

Abstract: Condensed Graphs provide a simple expression of complex dependencies in a program task graph or a work flow. In these graphs, nodes represent tasks and edges represent the sequencing constraints associated with those tasks. The sequence of task execution can be altered by altering the relationship between various nodes. These simple topological changes do not, in general, alter the meaning of the task graph or work flow (although they can affect program termination). Rather, they result in a change in execution order, reflecting either an imperative, data-driven or demand-driven computation. In fact, any desired combination of all three paradigms can be represented within the same task graph or work flow. This flexibility leads to many advantages both in the expression task graphs and in their implementation.

This talk will introduce the concept of Condensed Graphs and discuss various implementation platforms already developed for their execution. In particular, an overview of the WebCom Abstract Machine will be presented. A "Grid Enabled" version of this system, known as WebCom-G is currently being developed as a candidate operating system for Grid-Ireland. The mission of this project is to hide the complexities of computational platform from computational scientists - thus allowing them to concentrate on expressions of solutions to problems rather than on the implementation of those solutions. The status of this project will also be reported.

About speaker...

John Morrison is the founder and director of the Centre for Unified Computing. He is a co-founder and co-director of the Boole Centre for Research in Informatics and a co-founder and co-director of Grid-Ireland. Prof. Morrison is a Science Foundation of Ireland Investigator award holder and has published widely in the field of Parallel Distributed and Grid Computing. He has been the guest editor on many journals including the Journal of Super Computing, Future Generation Computing Systems and the Journal of Scientific Computing. He is also on the Editorial Board of a number of Journals. He is a member of the ACM and a senior member of the IEEE. Prof Morrison is a member of the I2Lab Advisory Board in the University of Central Florida. He has served on dozens of international conference programme committees.


Semantic approach to capacity and capability computing


Jacek Kitowski
AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland

Abstract: As number and diversity of data, information and resources increase importance of usage of knowledge for their accessing and reuse grows significantly. One of the most useful approaches is based on semantic description of elementary data and pieces of information as well as on relations between them, therefore resulting in ontological approach. Semantics is starting to be used in wider scope than ever, especially for accessing distributed resources. This field is well represented by the Semantic Web, where WWW content can be expressed also in a format that can be read and used by automated tools, thus permitting people and machines to find, share and integrate information more easily. Semantic description of services and user requests can also be used in (semi-)automatic construction of distributed/Grid applications, often in a form of workflows. In order to effectively manage ontologies on the level higher than the local one, e.g., using Virtual Organization approach some sort of knowledge base must be provided. In the lecture an overview of problems and advantages of this approach will be given with focus on unification of semantic description of services and resources through ontologies, as well as a proposal for organizational memory to enable storing and accessing metadata, kept in the form of ontologies. Contract negotiation problem for Virtual Organization creation will also be outlined.

About speaker...
Jacek Kitowski

Jacek Kitowski, professor of computer science (kito@agh.edu.pl), graduated in 1973 at the Electrical Department of the AGH University of Science and Technology in Cracow (Poland). He obtained Ph. D. in 1978 and D. Sc. (habilitation) in 1991 in computer science from the same University. Full professor since 2001. He is the Head of the Computer Systems Group at the Institute of Computer Science of the AGH University of Science and Technology in Cracow. He also works for the Academic Computer Centre CYFRONET-AGH, where he is responsible for developing high performance systems and grid solutions. He is the author or co-author of about 200 scientific papers. His topics of interest include large-scale computations, multiprocessor architectures, high availability systems, knowledge engineering, Grid services and Grid/distributed storage systems, ontologies, virtual organizations and SOA. He is the Associate Editor of Computing and Informatics and Editor-in-chief of Computer Science (Sci.Bull. of AGH-UST). He has been involved in many national and international projects, most notably in EU IST CrossGrid, EU IST Pellucid and EU IST K-WfGrid projects. At present he participates in EU GREDIA and EU int.eu.grid projects. Recently, he has been appointed as a Director of the Polish Grid Initiative Consortium. More info: http://www.icsr.agh.edu.pl/.